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Helping you put the customer at the heart of every decision.

Customers 2020 – The Research

Walker’s most recent Customers 2020 research was conducted in four phases, occurring mostly sequentially. Each phase had specific objectives based on the learning from the prior phase. Phase 1: Input from our research advisors. As mentioned previously, we involved six senior-level customer experience (CX) leaders to guide this research. We started with a group discussion

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Leslie Pagel

What’s the Best Measure of Success?

Have you heard of Conscious Capitalism? It’s a global movement that inspires business leaders to define success beyond profits. Conscious businesses subscribe to a win-win-win model. They aim to provide positive value in profit, people and the planet. One of the challenges that customer experience professionals face is demonstrating the impact or success of the

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Leslie Pagel

Don’t let your emotional intelligence steal your sparkle!

"Most often, success or failure in a job comes down to how we manage ourselves and how well we manage relationships with coworkers…not how much we know." Jennifer Shirkani

During the 2017 Walker B-to-B CX Summit, Jennifer Shirkani talked about the importance of emotional intelligence. I admit, until her presentation I thought emotional intelligence was akin to self-awareness. Boy, was I wrong.

Emotional intelligence is how we respond (or adapt) based on our self-awareness. Jennifer shared this example. Someone with high self-awareness and no emotional intelligence might be inclined to think, "This is who I am. Take it or leave it." While those with self-awareness and emotional intelligence are more likely to think, "This is who I am, but I can make temporary adjustments to adapt to others."

I often hear people blame others for their shortcomings – guilty as charged. But, perhaps it isn't them. It's our own self. Our emotional intelligence could be the thing that is stealing our sparkle.

So, what does this have to do with customer experience? A lot.

It's our job to put the customer at the heart of business. We must have our finger on the pulse of our customer relationships. We have to influence decisions without having authority. We have to engage the organization. When you think about it, our role has very little to do with our self-awareness, and everything to do with them – customers, employees, partners, investors, etc. Yes, we need to know ourselves, but we must be able to adapt if we're going to truly hear what our customers are saying and achieve buy-in and support throughout the organization.

What do you think?

Side note: This blog was inspired by my daughter, Lillian. She occasionally binge watches Greys Anatomy and recently accused Izzie of stealing Meredith's sparkle.

Five qualitative approaches to customer listening

Five qualitative approaches to customer listening:

  1. Customer advisory boards – Recruiting customers to provide ongoing feedback and participate in group sessions can generate excellent advice and improvements. Careful planning to recruit the right group of customers and structuring the sessions to focus on a few primary issues are important best practices.
  2. Focus groups – Focus groups can be conducted with a variety of small groups to obtain a well-rounded collection of insights. Expertise in managing the discussion is important to ensure all opinions are heard and to prevent anyone from dominating the discussion.
  3. Interviews – This technique is conducted one person at a time, either over the phone or in person. While it is more time consuming, it is a highly personal way to obtain terrific insights from various customers.
  4. Experience sessions – This complements techniques such as journey mapping. These sessions are about charting the ideal experience and leverage creativity and imagination to transform customer experiences.
  5. VOCE – Voice of the Customer through the Employee is all about understanding customers by asking the employees who work with them the most. Employees often are well aware of necessary improvements.